Top Monuments in Rome
5 Famous Monuments and Visiting Tips

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Rome is Italy’s most popular travel destination and a vibrant city full of great restaurants, nightlife, lively streets and beautiful squares. Rome offers the visitor a wide range of sights, from ancient to Renaissance and modern. These top monuments are a good cross-section of what Rome has to offer and can be seen for free as you walk around the city (although you’ll have to buy a ticket to go inside the Colosseum).

5 Famous Rome Monuments:

Rome’s Colosseum is the city’s most iconic monument. Also called the Flavian Amphitheater, it was built by the Flavian emperors Vespasian and Titus between 70 and 82 AD. Able to hold more than 50,00 spectators, the arena was used for many public events including gladiator and wild animal battles. Since the Colosseum is the most visited monument in Rome, you should buy Colosseum and Roman Forum passes in advance. The dungeons, or underground area, and upper tiers are now open to the public, but only on special guided tours.

The Pantheon, the Temple of all the Gods, is the best preserved monument of ancient Rome. Originally built by Emperor Hadrian between 118-125 AD, the building was transformed into a Christian church in the 7th century. The top feature of the Pantheon is its magnificent dome. The lively piazza by the Pantheon is ringed with bars and restaurants and is a great place to sit outside and admire the view, but be aware that sitting at an outside table at a bar can be costly.

pantheon dome photo
Pantheon Dome by James Martin

The Trevi Fountain, completed in 1732 and cleaned up in 2015, is an elaborate Baroque fountain with seahorses and cascading pools below a huge statue of Neptune. Although the fountain can be seen for free, it’s often very crowded so if you want to get a close look try to go in the early morning before tour groups start arriving. It’s said that if you throw a coin into the fountain, you’ll be assured of returning to Rome. The Trevi Fountain is on a small square below the Quirinale Palace, a former Papal residence that’s now the home of Italy’s President. Trevi Fountain photo credit: Browsing Rome.

Trevi Fountain photo

The Spanish Steps is a massive staircase leading from Piazza di Spagna to Trinita dei Monti Church above. The steps and square got their name from the Bourbon Spanish Embassy which was near the church at the top of the staircase when the steps were built in 1723-25. To the right of the steps as you start up is the Keats – Shelley House Museum in what was the house where John Keats lived and died in 1821. In spring, flowers adorn the steps and on December 8, the Pope comes to the Spanish Steps and Trinita dei Monti Church on the Day of the Immaculate Conception. Although the steps are often clogged with tourists using them as a resting place, beware that eating on them is forbidden. For great views, go up the steps to the Pincio Hill.

The Vittorio Emanuele Monument, on Piazza Venezia at the foot of the Capitoline Hill, is one of Rome’s more modern monuments. Vittorio Emanuele II, or Victor Emmanuel, was proclaimed king when Italy first became a united kingdom in 1861 and is known as the Father of the Nation. Construction of the massive white marble monument, which includes a statue of Vittorio Emanuele on horseback, started in 1885. Allegorical statues, reliefs and murals, created by artists from all over Italy, adorn the monument and below Emanuele’s statue is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The Capitoline Museums are on the hill above.

Victor Emmanuele monument
Vittorio Emanuele Monument

Vatican City

Although Vatican City is often visited on a trip to Rome, it’s actually not part of Italy but is the world’s smallest country. 5-6 million visitors a year come to see the Sistine Chapel and Vatican Museums so it’s highly recommended that you buy Vatican Museum tickets in advance.

Or better yet, take a Pre-opening Vatican small group tour to see the Sistine Chapel before the crowds or a Vatican Evening Tour, available on Fridays.

More Things to See and Do in Rome:

  • Visit Castel Sant’Angelo – Emperor Hadrian’s Mausoleum, Papal Palace, Prison, and Great Views.
  • See an authentic Roman neighborhood and eat traditional Roman food in the Testaccio or Trastevere districts. Although they are becoming more popular, there aren’t as many tourists (or tourist restaurants) in these neighborhoods and they are good areas to just wander.
  • Take an easy day trip to Ostia Antica to see the ruins of Rome’s ancient port, smaller and more accessible from Rome than Pompeii. See more Rome day trips.

Plan Your Visit to Rome

Rome Guide Books:

Tips for Sight-seeing in Rome:

  • Rome is big and there’s a lot to see! Don’t expect to see everything in a few days or even in a week. I’ve been to Rome many times and still see new things every time I’m there. There are many good day trips that can easily be taken from Rome, too.
  • The best way to see many of the sites is on foot so be sure you have good walking shoes. Public transportation is also a good way to get around but it’s often very crowded. A fun way to get around is on a Segway tour or an e-bike tour. Visit some sites by car with a little walking with the Roman Guy’s Best of Rome Driving and Walking Tour (5% discount with promo code ITALYMARTHA). There are also hop on/hop off buses that get you close to most of the major sites.
  • You’re unlikely to be a victim of violent crime in Rome, but you should be careful of pickpockets, as is true in many big cities around the world. They are especially common on the crowded metro and where there are lots of tourists, including in Vatican City. Never carry your passport or valuables where they can be stolen. See How to Safeguard or Replace Your Passport.

More: Discover Florence’s 5 Top Monuments and Italy’s Top 5 Cities to Visit

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